I don’t know what the weather is like in your neck of the woods, but in D.C., it is a dark and depressing, with a few sprinkles thrown in for good measure. Since the meteorologists are suggesting that the rain will get worse as the day goes on, the Mysterious Mr. C and I are planning on enjoying a low-key day at home – reading, working on some wedding stuff, and trying out a few different recipes for the blog. However you choose to spend your weekend, I hope it’s a good one! 

Ingvard the Terrible

Ingvard the Terrible

1. The link I loved most this week was the one I found on Fashionably Geek (by way of Geek x Girls and Cheezburger) of a number of revamped female superhero costumes by an illustrator known as “Ingvard the Terrible.” While it seems that he received some flack for his snarky tone, I really loved it because the things he points out are just so ridiculous and deserve to be called out. But even if you don’t like the drawings – something he readily admits may not be that good – you still have to admire his intention “to at least TRY to approach the subject of female superheroes with the degree of logic, equality, and respect they – and their readers – deserve.”

College Humor/Amy Kim

College Humor/Amy Kim

2. While it is certainly true that most Disney movies are missing mothers – and for an incredibly tragic reason – I hadn’t really thought about it that much until seeing this series of comics on College Humor. In a way, the images remind me of the Second City Network’s “Sassy Gay Friend” series on YouTube (the Shakespeare ones are the best!) and how additional perspectives are always helpful! To be sure, some of the mothers come across as a bit shrewish in Amy Kim’s renderings, but I also could totally picture them saying those things, if given the chance.

Slate

Slate

3. Though I never watched NBC’s Hannibal, I can certainly sympathize with the viewers who found out this week that their favorite television show had been cancelled. Sometimes the show writers have a chance to wrap up loose ends and provide a fitting conclusion for the viewers, and sometimes, they end “before every mystery is solved, every comeuppance received, every redemption found.” To help us mourn, the folks over at Slate created a virtual graveyard for all of the shows that were canceled this year and have enabled us to leave flowers on the graves of the ones we miss the most. I will admit that it feels a little morbid, but it’s also very cathartic.

Behance/Nicolas Amiard

Behance/Nicolas Amiard

4. Earlier this week, the Huffington Post highlighted some photos by Nicolas Amiard, an art director at a Paris-based ad agency, that show what things might look like if the battleships from Star Wars crash-landed here on Earth. Amiard picked recognizable cities, such as London, New York City, Paris, and Rio de Janerio, for the collisions, and due to his incredible retouching skills, the photos are quite realistic.

Amblin Entertainment

Amblin Entertainment

5. I first became interested in foley artistry (sound-mixing) about 20 years ago when I saw a brief short about it while watching an episode of PBS’s Wishbone. I still remember that it was the episode featuring Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities and that the show’s foley artist used the sound of chopping a head of cabbage for the guillotine. In fact, for a period of time after that, I wanted to grow up to be a foley artist myself!

While that dream didn’t quite pan out, I am still intrigued by all of the different sounds – and layers of sounds – that go into some of our favorite movie moments! Thanks to the folks at SoundWorks Collection, we now have two videos that explain some of the work that went into The Avengers: Age of Ultron and Jurassic World. It really is fascinating to see (and hear) what all was used to create the sounds of Ultron, the Indominus Rex, the Velociraptors, and the Mosasaur!

American Girl/TV Tropes

American Girl/TV Tropes

6. This last link really proves that nothing ever dies on the Internet since it was posted several years ago. However, it didn’t come to my attention until earlier this week when my cousin-in-law posted it on her Facebook page!

I grew up with the original American Girl® dolls – Felicity, Kirsten, Addy, Samantha, and Molly – and was lucky enough to actually have all five of them (only Addy and Samantha are still available). Though Molly was my favorite, since she was the first doll I got and looked most like me, I really enjoyed all of them and their individual stories, which provided an entry point into different cultures and historical events. As the Washington Post’s Alexandra Petri writes: “Felicity or Samantha or Addy reminded you that, during the Civil War and the Revolutionary War and all the fascinating important times of history, there were Girls Almost But Not Quite Like You. You could see yourself in history! You could engage with the biggest moments of the past!” For dolls, there was a lot of substance to them too.

While I remember when the customizable dolls first started showing up in my American Girl® catalogue, they never held the same sort of interest for me and it’s sad to be reminded that that is what the majority of the company has become. I am sure girls today love having dolls that they can truly make like them, but I’m personally glad that – should I have a daughter – she will have the historical ones to play with instead.

 

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